The Home Connection – September 2017

The Home Connection September 2017


Posted on August 30, 2017 at 9:00 am
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Housing Supply is an Issue that Will Not Improve Any Time Soon and Here’s Why

 

There are two common concerns about the housing market that one hears from both consumers and real estate professionals alike. First, they question whether or not we are on the brink of another housing bubble, and second, they want to know why there aren’t more homes for sale.

I don’t plan on addressing the concern regarding a housing bubble in this article except to say that we are not currently in “bubble” territory, although affordability does concern me immensely. Today I would like to concentrate on the second question about the lack of homes for sale.

According to the National Association of REALTORS®, there were 1.96 million homes for sale in the United States in May 2017. When adjusted for seasonality, this falls to just below 1.9 million which is essentially the same level we saw back in 2000.

Now consider that the country has added over 21 million new households during that same time period, and you can see why this is so troubling. It is worth noting that many of these new households did move into rental properties, but this still leaves the U.S. with a substantial housing shortfall, which explains why demand for homes is so high.

With the shortage of homes for sale, you would normally expect builders to meet this pent-up demand with new construction housing but, unfortunately, this has not been the case. In fact, new single-family housing starts are running at about 800,000 (annualized), and I believe we need starts to come in at over 1 million to satisfy demand – especially as older Millennials start to create households of their own and begin thinking about buying instead of renting.

We therefore have a quandary. Trust in the housing market has clearly returned, but there are not enough homes to meet the demand of buyers, and when a buyer does find a home, they are met with very stiff competition, which is driving prices increasingly higher.

So why are we in this position and how do we get out of it?

In reality, there is no single reason for the situation we are in today. Rather it is a number of factors that, when combined, suggest to me that the market will not return to equilibrium any time soon.

The first reason for the shortfall is purely demographic. As “Boomers” age, they are not following the trends of previous generations. Many are staying in the workforce far longer than their predecessors, and, as they are postponing retirement, they do not feel compelled to downsize. In fact, almost two-thirds of Boomers plan to age in place and not move even after retirement. Without this anticipated supply of homes from downsizing Boomers, there aren’t enough homes for move-up buyers, which in turn limits the supply of homes for first-time buyers.

Secondly, as a nation we just aren’t moving as often as we used to. When I analyze mobility, it is clear that people no longer have to relocate as frequently to find a job that matches their skill set. There has been a tangible drop in geographic specificity of occupations. Where we used to move to find work, this is no longer as prevalent, which means we are moving with less frequency.

Thirdly, as mentioned earlier, builders aren’t building as many homes as they could. This is essentially due to three factors: land supply/regulation, labor, and materials. The costs related to building a home have risen rapidly since the Great Recession, and this is holding many builders back from building to their potential. Furthermore, in order to justify the additional costs, many of the homes that are being built are larger and more expensive, and this is no help for the first-time buyer who simply can’t afford a new construction price tag.

Fourthly, while the general consensus is that home prices have recovered from the major correction that was seen following the recession, this is actually not the case in some markets. In fact, there are 32 U.S. metro areas where home prices are still more than 15 percent below the pre-recession peak. As equity levels remain low, or non-existent, in these markets, many would-be sellers are waiting until they have sufficient equity in their homes before putting them on the market.

And there is still one more issue that is certain to become a major factor over the next few years: interest rates.

Imagine, if you will, the country a few years from now when interest rates have normalized to levels somewhere around 6 percent. Now consider potential home sellers who are happily locked in at a mortgage rate of about 4 percent who are considering their options. Will they sell and lose the historically low rate that they currently have? Remember that for every 1 percent increase in rates, buyers can afford 10 percent less house. If they don’t HAVE to sell, their thoughts may lead to remodeling rather than moving. I think that this is a very reasonable hypothesis which could lead us to see low inventory levels for a lot longer than many think.

With little assistance from the new home market, I believe we will suffer from low inventory levels until well into 2018.

Our best hope for a more balanced market lies with builders, so hopefully they’ll be allowed to do what they do best – build more homes.

 

This post was originally seen on the Winderemere Real Estate blog.


Posted on August 29, 2017 at 5:05 pm
Redmond Office | Posted in Windermere Redmond Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Are We in a Housing Bubble?

As home prices in King County have reached record highs, some people are wondering whether we are approaching another housing bubble.

While it’s true that home prices here have surpassed the last peak hit during the housing bubble, that doesn’t mean we are in bubble territory today. The last bubble was fueled by faulty mortgage practices. Today, loans are granted on much more sound principles.

More importantly, the local economy is flourishing. Seattle has the fastest growing population of any major city in the country. The demand for homes, and historically low inventory, have been the catalyst for rising home prices here.

Still not convinced that there is no bubble? Let’s take a look at the statistics.

King County Median Sales Price

According to data from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service, the median home price in King County rose steadily since 1993 (the first year the NWMLS reported median home figures), fell during the crash, and has risen since 2012.

Now, let’s assume there was no housing bubble and crash in the mid-2000s and that home prices appreciated at normal historic levels for King County, which has been an average annual rate of 6 percent for many decades. This graph compares actual home prices (blue bars) with what prices would have been with normal appreciation (orange bars) over the same period.

King County Median Sales Price

Bottom Line: Had there not been a boom and bust, based on historic appreciation rates home values would be close to where they are right now. However, there is no doubt that home prices have risen rapidly the past few years, and that rate of appreciation can’t be sustained over the long term. If you are considering buying a home today, make sure you can afford the payments, and choose a location that will appeal to you for years to come.

This post was originally seen on the Windermere Eastside blog.

Posted on August 28, 2017 at 5:11 pm
Redmond Office | Posted in Windermere Redmond Blog | Tagged , , , , , , ,

The Home Connection -August 2017

The Home Connection August 2017


Posted on July 31, 2017 at 11:40 pm
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The Home Connection – July 2017


Posted on June 28, 2017 at 11:05 pm
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Home Maintenance Checklist – Summer Tips

There’s no time like the summertime to start tackling some home maintenance. For the hot summer months, this quick checklist offers tips and advice to keep you home’s systems in good working order throughout the year.

Summer Home Maintenance


Posted on June 8, 2017 at 6:25 pm
Redmond Office | Posted in Windermere Redmond Blog | Tagged , ,

The Home Connecton – June 2017

real estate market update june edition


Posted on May 26, 2017 at 8:00 am
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The Trump Administration’s Impact on U.S. Housing

Will the Trump administration have an impact on the U.S. housing market? Windermere Chief Economist, Matthew Gardner, weighs in on how mortgage rates, inflation, and the possible repeal of Dodd-Frank could impact housing in the foreseeable future.

This post originally appeared on the Windermere.com blog.


Posted on May 22, 2017 at 8:57 pm
Redmond Office | Posted in Windermere Redmond Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Schedule Your Early Donation to GiveBIG to the Windermere Foundation!

 On Wednesday, May 10, from midnight to midnight Pacific Time, the Windermere Foundation is participating in Seattle Foundation’s GiveBIG, a one-day online giving event to raise funds for nonprofit organizations serving the greater Seattle area.

Advanced giving has already begun. You can schedule your donation at any point between now and before midnight on May 10. (Your donation won’t be processed until May 10.) For early giving only, donors will need to create a simple profile that includes their name, email and a password. Click here to GiveBIG for the Windermere Foundation!

All the money raised through the GiveBIG program will benefit nonprofits in the King County region, specifically providing emergency services for low-income and homeless families through our grant program and some of our nonprofit partners.

No matter what you give, it will make a BIG difference in the lives of low-income and homeless families in your communities!

We hope you will support us on May 10. Thank you for your generosity and support!

This post originally appeared on Windermere Weekly.


Posted on May 3, 2017 at 9:31 pm
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The Home Connection – May 2017


Posted on April 27, 2017 at 5:57 pm
Redmond Office | Posted in The Home Connection, Windermere Redmond Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,